International News Desk – At Home: Saskatchewan drivers may soon face cellphone ban – In Foreign News: Australian breakthrough could regrow breast tissue

International News Desk – At Home: Saskatchewan drivers may soon face cellphone ban – In Foreign News: Australian breakthrough could regrow breast tissue

At Home: Saskatchewan drivers may soon face cellphone ban

On October 26, new legislation made Ontario the fourth province to ban cellphones while behind the wheel. And Saskatchewan could be next, with a new law expected as early as January 1, 2010.

As the CBC reports, the Saskatchewan government introduced legislation on November 11 that would ?ban drivers from talking, texting and web surfing on hand-held cellphones.?

However, unlike in some other provinces the proposed law would mean different rules for different drivers. New drivers would be banned from using cellphones of any kind, while more experienced drivers would still be allowed to use their cellphones hands-free. The Ontario legislation goes beyond cellphone use to ban drivers from using any handheld electronic device, such as DVD players and portable video games.

Penalties also vary between provinces. The proposed Saskatchewan law includes a penalty of $280 and four demerit points. In Newfoundland and Labrador (the first province to ban cellphones while driving), the penalty is a fine of up to $400 and four demerit points.

The ?inattentional blindness? caused by cellphones is increasingly recognized as a problem that goes beyond driving. In a recent study at Western Washington University, a brightly dressed clown on a unicycle performed in the main campus square. About 150 college-aged people crossed the square, passing close to the clown. When questioned, those using cellphones ?were less than half as likely to notice the clown as those listening to music players or single individuals without any electronics.?

In Foreign News: Australian breakthrough could regrow breast tissue

A new breakthrough by Australian scientists could allow women to regrow breast tissue after full or partial mastectomies. The ?experimental stem cell breast-growing technique? is called Neopec, and It’s hoped that the technology ?could replace breast reconstructions and implants within three years,? according to The Telegraph.

The team of Melbourne scientists will test the experimental surgery at St. Vincent’s Hospital. Five women will undergo the procedure within two weeks of having mastectomies. The technique will see a breast-shaped chamber inserted in a woman’s chest. The chamber will be implanted with the woman’s own fat cells, which will multiply quickly and will be shaped by the chamber ?to replace the breast tissue the woman lost.?

The technology has been successful in trials using pigs, and when perfected may allow women to regrow breasts within a period of months. The development holds a great deal of promise for those recovering from mastectomies, although it may not be ready for widespread use for at least 10 years.

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