International News Desk – At Home: All Moneyed Up and No Place to Go – Around the World: Better Late Than Never

International News Desk – At Home: All Moneyed Up and No Place to Go – Around the World: Better Late Than Never

At Home: All Moneyed Up and No Place to Go

What would you do if you suddenly became a multi-millionaire? Quit your job and live a life of luxury? Take an exotic vacation? Buy a bigger home or fancier car? Or pay off debt and then go on a little shopping spree?

For a recent Lotto Max winner, the question isn’t so much what to do with the money but what to do with the time. As the Edmonton Sun reports, Darrell Szczerba, the Edmonton man who won $30 million last month, is finding the life of a multi-millionaire a bit tedious. In fact, he’s ?contemplating a return to the daily grind just to alleviate boredom.?

Currently Szczerba is considering ?returning to work at the concrete restoration company? where he’d been employed prior to winning.

Szczerba’s old boss told reporters that Szczerba is ?a really grounded guy? and that ?he’s . . . used to going to work each day.?

Though some are calling his actions bizarre, there’s something to be said for the notion of sudden wealth not changing one’s personality.

Around the World: Better Late Than Never

Had to make the library walk of shame recently? You know, the one where you clandestinely slip the long-overdue book onto the return table as though nothing was wrong?and then wait for the five-dollar fine to show up on your card? For one library patron, the stakes were quite a bit higher.

As The Independent reports, an elderly Estonian man recently returned a book that was 69 years overdue. The accumulated fine? Over £1400.

The man, who was in his late 80s, checked out Kulmale Maale, by Eduard Vilde, in March 1944?just days before the Nazi-occupied Estonian town was ?damaged during a World War Two aerial bombing.?

Although the library sustained damage during the air strike, it ?remained open, and became a shelter for the librarians and nearby residents.?

Now, almost seven decades later, it was time for the book to make its way home.

A librarian told reporters that the patron was ?extremely sorry, almost tearful, and terribly frightened about the fine of the overdue book.?

However, the library, happy to have the book back, waived the hefty fee.

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