Posts By: Wanda Waterman

Wanda Waterman

Wanda Waterman is a poet, spoken word artist, blogger, cultural journalist, and digital nomad. She’s been writing regularly for The Voice Magazine since 2004, not long after she began studying psychology at Athabasca. Her poetry has been published in Descant, The Talking Leaves, Chizine, Our Times, The Best of Tigertail, and Pottersfield Portfolio and her articles in Design is Political, Rawckus Magazine, Coastal Life, The New Internationalist, This Magazine, and in her blog, The Mindful Bard. She grew up in Nova Scotia, but after having lived in New Hampshire and North Africa she’s now settled in Montreal.

The Unexpected Perks of Victimhood

“You can either be a victim of the world or an adventurer in search of treasure.  It all depends on how you view your life.” – Paulo Coelho Victimhood can help you get away with being a schmuck.  This strategy was writ large in Cabbagehead, a character invented by the eighties comedy troupe the Kids… Read more »

Gypsies of the Digital World

In one of the final scenes of the brilliant documentary Latcho Drom the gypsy chanteuse known as “La Caita” sings “The Blackbird” before an unnamed European city: Why does your wicked mouth spit on me? What harm is it to you that my skin is dark and my hair gypsy hair black? From Isabelle the… Read more »

The Waterman Guide to Online Writing for Businesses

The first thing you need to know about writing for business is that you should avoid it like the plague. If there’s anything else you could possibly be doing to earn money, such as moonshining or exorcism, do that. Why, you ask? Because most businesspeople don’t know what good writing is or why it’s necessary…. Read more »

The (Marginal) Joys of Marginalization

“At some point or another, everyone has felt unseen and unheard and marginalized.” Ayanna Pressley If you remember the comic strip Bloom County, you may recall Binkley and his dad having a discussion in which they realize that their status as white, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant, men puts them in the minority. The irony of course is… Read more »

An Existential Crisis Called Unemployment

“I had never considered that you might miss a job like you missed a limb — a constant, reflexive thing. I hadn’t thought, as well as the obvious fears about money, and your future, losing your job would make you feel inadequate, and a bit useless. That it would be harder to get up in… Read more »