Posts By: Wanda Waterman

Wanda Waterman

Wanda Waterman is a poet, spoken word artist, blogger, cultural journalist, and digital nomad. She’s been writing regularly for The Voice Magazine since 2004, not long after she began studying psychology at Athabasca. Her poetry has been published in Descant, The Talking Leaves, Chizine, Our Times, The Best of Tigertail, and Pottersfield Portfolio and her articles in Design is Political, Rawckus Magazine, Coastal Life, The New Internationalist, This Magazine, and in her blog, The Mindful Bard. She grew up in Nova Scotia, but after having lived in New Hampshire and North Africa she’s now settled in Montreal.

Fighting Dunning-Kruger

A friend’s marketing career hit a bump when he hired a graphic artist to create a three-dimensional model for an important project.  She claimed she could do it, and he believed her. Time dwindled away and she wasn’t getting it done.  She continued to insist she could do it, that she could do it exceptionally… Read more »

In Conversation—with Mangeur de Rêves

Alex Cégé: voice, acoustic guitar Jici LG: electric guitar, voice, acoustic guitar JPhil Major: bass, voice, acoustic guitar Raphaël Liberge-Simard: percussion Florent Schmitt: electric piano Mangeur de Rêves (“Dream Eater”) is a Montreal-based folk-rock band that formed in 2016. The band has just released their debut album, Histoires a l’envers (backwards stories), a masterpiece of… Read more »

When Vengeance Means Doing the Right Thing

In the 1982 western Barbarosa Willie Nelson plays an outlaw who refuses to allow his father-in-law’s hostility to keep him from looking after his wife and daughter.  As much as his wife’s father wishes to destroy him, or at least drive him away forever, Barbarosa sneaks in every now and then with stolen money for… Read more »

The Mindful Bard—The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

Film:  The Ballad of Buster Scruggs Directors: Ethan and Joel Coen It would be too easy to claim this film as an indictment of the United States alone, but its historical setting predates any solid sense of Canadian identity.  The characters, like my parents and great grandparents, freely moved back and forth across the border,… Read more »