News From AU – Contributed by The Insider

AU graduate appointed to COC
Christian Farstad, financial officer, chartered financial analyst and AU graduate, has been named Director, Athletic Relations for the Canadian Olympic Committee. Read more here.

AU Profs Get Piece of Funding Pie
AU’s Drs. Oscar Lin and Peter Holt have each been named to receive some of $325 million in new research funds from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada [NSERC]. Read more here.

Humidity at AU

Greg Wiens, Director of Facilities and Services at Athabasca University, concludes a three-part series devoted to helping us understand humidity, where it comes from, and how it affects comfort levels and personal health issues at AU.

The main Athabasca University campus building, located at 1 University Drive in Athabasca is supplied tempered ventilation air by nine separate systems. Each air system contains an evaporative system, also known as an adiabatic system, to increase the humidity level of the supplied air. The relative humidity of the ventilation air supply is continuously computer monitored and adjusted to achieve the supply air relative humidity set point during normal building hours.

As the outside temperature changes, so does the relative humidity set point for inside ventilation air. For example, the relative humidity set point at +10 C (and warmer) is 40 per cent, at -1C is 35 per cent and at -30 C (and colder) is 20 per cent. These humidity set points allow for providing an increase in the indoor air relative humidity while protecting both the building and its occupants from the serious long-term risks associated with high humidity levels inappropriate for the building design and local weather conditions.

This ability to increase the relative humidity levels is important, as the naturally occurring outdoor humidity levels in the colder winter periods tend to be low, sometimes in the single digits. Heating this almost dry outside air, without the continuous addition of water to achieve the indoor humidity set point, would make the air very dry indeed. Most buildings in Athabasca and area do not provide humidification to the inside air thus their typical indoor relative humidity in the winter tend to be less than 10 per cent during the colder winter months.

Science Outreach continues this summer
– Submitted by Science Outreach – Athabasca

Science can be both fun and educational. This summer Science Outreach – Athabasca is helping to offer four science events for children. This is great for working parents, and for an additional $5 you can your child can be dropped off at 8 am and picked up at 5 pm at Athabasca Landing Pool. Ask for details when you register with Athabasca Regional Recreation.

Jr. Paleontology Camp
Date: Monday, July 7, 2003
Place: Grassland School
Time: 10 am – 2 pm
Ages: 6-12 years
Price: $12; Register with Athabasca Recreation, 4705 – 49 Avenue, 675-2967

Become a junior paleontologist for the day! Join Indiana Kirsten on an adventure in Grassland to learn how to “Walk with the Dinosaurs.” Enjoy a scavenger hunt, check out some real fossils and dinosaur bones, and go through a Science-In-A-Crate exhibit from Science Alberta Foundation.

Children should bring a lunch, including a drink, shoes that can get wet, a jacket (we go out rain or shine), hat, and sunscreen.

Discover Crawly Critters
Date: Tuesday, July 8, 2003
Place: Muskeg Creek Chalet, Athabasca
Time: 9 am – 3 pm
Ages: 6-12
Price: $10; Register with Athabasca Recreation, 4705 – 49 Avenue, 675-2967

Join biologists, Robert Holmberg and Lisa Carter, to examine the critters that inhabit Muskeg Creek and the surrounding area. We will look at earthworms and insects with hand lenses and microscopes, have a nature scavenger hunt and go through a Science-In-A-Crate exhibit from Science Alberta Foundation.

Children should bring a lunch, including a drink, shoes that can get wet, a jacket (we go out rain or shine), hat, and sunscreen.

Mad Chemist : Learn to Have Fun with Chemistry
Date: Wednesday, July 9, 2003
Place: Muskeg Creek Chalet, Athabasca
Time: 9 am – 3 pm
Ages: 6-12 years
Price: $10; Register with Athabasca Recreation, 4705 – 49 Avenue, 675-2967

Learn to have “Fun with Chemistry.” Join chemist, Dietmar Kennepohl and scientist, Lisa Carter, in a fun-filled day of “gold panning,” and discovering the mysteries of chemistry.

Children should bring a lunch, including a drink, shoes that can get wet, a jacket (we go out rain or shine), hat, and sunscreen.

Athabasca Butterfly Count
Date: Saturday, July 12, 2003
Time: 1 – 4 pm
Location: Muskeg Creek Chalet, 56 Street and 49 Avenue, Athabasca
Ages: All ages (children younger than 12 must be accompanied by an adult)
Fee: Free

Come and learn something about butterflies, and contribute to our knowledge of what species occur here and in what numbers. For more information, check out our current events section on our web page: http://scienceoutreach.ab.ca.

Bring walking shoes, water bottle, and sun protection. Optional items include butterfly book, binoculars, and an insect net (some provided).

Science Outreach – Athabasca promotes science activities in the greater Athabasca area and science research throughout the Athabasca River Basin. Contact Linda Lindballe, Science Outreach – Athabasca Coordinator at 675-6653, or e-mail sc-outreach.coord@athabascau.ca. You may also send a message snail mail to Science Outreach – Athabasca, Centre for Science, Athabasca University, Athabasca, AB, T9S 3A3. Check out our Web-page at http://scienceoutreach.ab.ca.

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